Beau's story

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Beausdaddy
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:05 am

Beau's story

Post by Beausdaddy » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:13 am

Hello everyone,

I am new to the forum, but not to the life of a parent of an epileptic dog. Our story starts five years ago when I decided that my girl Bella needed a friend. So we searched and found Beau. He was a rescue, a dachshund (or so I thought) and just a bundle of pure love. At about the three month mark we had our first seizure. It was three am in the morning and I was woken up by a loud thumping under my bed. The poor pup was having a seizure under my bed. Thus began our journey. I began to research what was going on, went to my vet and we put a plan together. The seizures continued to happen, increasing in length and severity, as well as the number he would have. At our worst point we had 15 seizures in one day.

We are now on three medicines.( Keppra, Pheno, and Zoainasmide)and we seem to have the clusters under control. We tend to have one to two seizures every six weeks. Recovery is fast, if i am home, as we have found that eating directly after the seizure helps us to come back around. We have worked out a lot of the kinks that his anxiety caused, and seem to be getting to a better quality of life. So here is where I need some help.

Since we have only just gotten things to a stable point, we have never become house trained. I removed all the carpet from my house ( Beau likes to lick fabric, and I was wondering if chemicals in the carpet may be causing the seizures) because Beau pees after or during his seizure. I work two jobs, (medicine is expensive) but I make a point of being home between jobs and am trying to get on a walking schedule. I now get up at 330 am every morning to give him his meds so that he is on a 12 hour cycle. I need help in potty training. We were doing well until the clusters started. Also advice on crating. I feel like a crate would help with his anxiety. I believe that he had a series of seizures in his crate and now is afraid of it. Any tips on how to handle the seizure while you are away from the house would be helpful too.

Thank you so much,
Brian

Box40Rin
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 1:42 pm

Re: Beau's story

Post by Box40Rin » Fri Feb 16, 2018 4:31 am

Good morning,
I'm one of the moderators of this forum and a retired veterinarian.
One of the posters to this blog uses a web cam to watch his dog while he is at work. He is away from home for ten to twelve hours.
As to crating, I have always crated my dogs. It is their house and they will go there on their own . You seem to have a different problem in that Beau seems to be afraid of his crate. Maybe putting a treat inside would entice him to enter, he could come out again and maybe gradually he could overcome his fear. I just don't know. It's difficult when you don't ive with the dog. Also, maybe just confining him and his buddy to one room might work. You probably really need a canine psychologist of dog whisperer to find out what Beau is thinking or what he fears. This hasn't been much help at all, just my first thoughts on this subject.

Let me or us as others are reding this, how this goes. we're interested. box40rin

ShilohsMom
Posts: 814
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 1:42 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: Beau's story

Post by ShilohsMom » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:23 am

Hi Brian,

I'm really sorry that you're having to go through this and understand about getting up in the middle of the night to administer meds. I was able to use the goodrx coupon at WalMart for some of the meds Shiloh was on. It saved me quite a bit of money, especially on his Keppra. You might look and see if that would be available to hopefully save a little bit.

As far as crating. I'm not a big fan of crating a dog who has seizures. First, because I was always afraid that Shiloh would get his leg stuck between the wires and break his leg. Second, when Shiloh would come out of the seizure he was always disoriented and that could last quite a while, the more seizures he had the longer and more intense it became and the thought of him being in that condition and not being able to get out was more than I could bear. It was hard enough just watching him aimlessly go through the house all confused. I have a job where I was able to go home at lunch which was good and the first thing I'd do is look and see if Shiloh's face was wet or hair stiff and urine on the floor. I did my best to seizure proof the rooms, removing small tables/lamps that could fall on him, removed the door stops cause he liked to lay by the front door and was afraid he'd impale himself, put waterproof pads on chairs and couch that he liked to lay on, etc.

If you're wanting to crate him I'd start slow. Putting a high value treat in it toward the front, when he gets used to that keep moving it back. If he does eventually go in, don't close the door until he seems more comfortable, then close the door when he's in it for 15-30 seconds. Slowly increase based on how he seems to be handling everything. The scent of lavender can be calming for dogs and a drop of two on his collar may be helpful for anxiety.

This is a journey that will take some time but it sounds like you're on the right track.
Colleen, Rylie, Sophie & angels Izzie & Shiloh
DOB: 11/11/05
First seizure: 07/28//10
Last seizure: 06/27/16

Beausdaddy
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:05 am

Re: Beau's story

Post by Beausdaddy » Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:29 am

I wanted to give an update on my boy:

We have been doing very well lately. The getting up at 330am to administer medication seems to have helped with the seizure activity. My boy comes with me to the kitchen, takes his meds, eats a little food and then goes back to my bed. He drops right back to sleep. I have managed to change my works schedule by thirty min, which allows for longer walks. This has helped a lot with his anxiety. We have also started consistently peeing outside on our last walk of the day. I cant tell you how much the love and support from this community has helped me. Even if no one has responded, being able to read your stories and see that I am not alone in this has made such a difference.

ShilohsMom
Posts: 814
Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 1:42 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Re: Beau's story

Post by ShilohsMom » Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:09 am

I am so happy to hear of the positive progress you've made!!! One thing is for sure, we have to take our victories where we can and this is huge. Please keep us posted.
Colleen, Rylie, Sophie & angels Izzie & Shiloh
DOB: 11/11/05
First seizure: 07/28//10
Last seizure: 06/27/16

Beausdaddy
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:05 am

Re: Beau's story

Post by Beausdaddy » Mon Apr 09, 2018 9:12 am

Starting on the 13th of March, we have been ramping up on our seizures. The only link that I can find in all of his seizure activity is sleep. In almost all instances he has been sleeping and will jump up and have a grand maul seizure. In the last week he has had Six seizures alone. It seems that we are headed back towards the cluster pattern. Has anyone else had a pup that the seizures start when he or she is sleeping? I just scheduled a glucose insulin check with my vet for tomorrow.

jaragr
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2015 2:34 pm

Re: Beau's story

Post by jaragr » Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:38 am

My dog had 2 seizures yesterday, 6 hours apart. He was asleep both times, the 2nd one was more intense. The paddling was really hard, and afterwards he spent the day just dragging. But yes, he is sound asleep. He goes about 13 weeks and is on no seizure medication, but we know if he has a seizure in the morning, he's going to have another one and he does. We close off the dog door so he can't get out - fearing he will fall off the ramp and break a leg. He is so off balance that we make him wait to go outside. Those things take a lot out of him, and he acts like he is sore. I can't stand it to be honest.

Beausdaddy
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:05 am

Re: Beau's story

Post by Beausdaddy » Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:16 am

My vet and I discussed Beau's seizures. I had noticed that every time this year he seems to ramp up and have more. At first I thought maybe it is an allergy issue, and then I realized that he gets really hot when he sleeps. I also at this time of year get hot when I sleep. So we put a fan in the room and it blows directly on my bed. We have gone three nights without a seizure. My vet said the white noise also may help him. I truly believe that this fan is helping us.

Beausdaddy
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:05 am

Re: Beau's story

Post by Beausdaddy » Wed Jul 25, 2018 8:12 pm

I am sad to say that Beau's story has come to an end. The tumor that was on his pancreas was causing to many problems. About a month ago he had a seizure at 11 pm and continued to have them every two hours for the next 14 hours. He suffered a grand maul at three in the afternoon and after consulting with my vet we decided that it was time to let him go. It was very peaceful and I was able to be with him and make sure that he knew that he was loved. Thank you to everyone that has given me advice or cheered us on as we went through this journey. Good luck to you all.

xxcesarxx
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:59 pm

Re: Beau's story

Post by xxcesarxx » Thu Jul 26, 2018 11:29 pm

I'm so sorry about your loss, my baby had cluster seizures every 10 days since november, 2016 and put him down in Feb 2018. We fought many battles together and my epi warrior won the war , he won because he is up in heaven now, free and healthy, no more seizures, I understand your pain, i found this forum called rainbow bridge, a great forum for pet loss support, feel free to join us. My condolences Brian.

GentleJacob's Mom
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Beau's story

Post by GentleJacob's Mom » Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:55 am

I'm so sorry to hear about Beau. We always have a special bond with our fur babies, but the bond we have with these very special seizure dogs adds a layer we never knew existed. We lost Jake a year ago last week and I still miss him every day. Be kind to yourself. You did the very best you could fighting a relentless disease.

Take Care,
Lynne

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