Now, here's an insoluble one!

This is the main focus of the research underway by the Canine Epilepsy Research Consortium. Some of your questions may not have clear answers at this time, but ask them anyway!

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Dougie
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Now, here's an insoluble one!

Post by Dougie » Mon Nov 19, 2001 5:36 am

Orkney, Scotland, UK

"Snorri" is a 3 1/2 year old Border Collie, born on a farm here in Orkney. He started having saiezures in May 2001 and is now on Phenobarb.

We have been giving some thought to the cause of his epilepsy, but have decided that it will be impossible to work out. Here's why! - 1) He has what may be a birth defect, in that his nose is too long for his bottom jaw and his head is a bit too narrow; 2) we think kis father is also his brother; 3) his mother was pretty much on her "best before" date when she became pregnant; 4) he was about her puppy no.130 and 5) it seems to run in the family - we know an older brother who is epileptic, too (see below).

He was not so much bred, as "just happened"! On a working farm, where all the dogs (5 in this case) live in a barn, these things happen!

We are fairly sure that, with a history like that, nobody will ever work out why he ended up with epilepsy - but if anyone wants to make the attempt, feel free to do so!

Whilst he may have come from working parents, Snorri would never have made it as a working dog - he was born to be a pet! We are blessed with a lot of beaches near home, our second dog is also a brother, so all three lads (our two and the other epileptic brother) go for lots of luaus by the sea. We believe Snorri enjoys life, despite his affliction - and that's the important thing! The fact that we get battered black-and-blue in the process is of no account!

Ned Patterson DVM
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Post by Ned Patterson DVM » Mon Nov 19, 2001 11:09 am

Dougie,

There are many things that can cause repeated seizures. We categorize them into too broad categories - primary epilepsy also referred to as idiopathic, inherited, or 'true' epilepsy, and symptomatic epilepsy which is caused by pathological processes in the brain (tumor, inflammation, infection etc), and metabolic abnormalities (low sugra, low calcium, liver disease etc.). See the canine epilepsy basics section for more details.

It sound like your dog might have an inherited form of epilepsy, but there is no way to know that for sure until we discover genes causing canine epilepsy - which is why we are doing the research. We would be interested in having your dog and related dogs (parents, siblings, other related affected dogs) join our research project. See the research section of the website. The forms are in the sample submission section and include instructions for participation from countries outside the US.

While inherited epilepsy sounds likely based on the details you have given, it is still possible that your dog could have symptomatic epilepsy, and this could be discussed further with your vet.

[This message has been edited by Ned Patterson DVM (edited 11-19-2001).]

Dougie
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Post by Dougie » Wed Nov 21, 2001 7:12 am

Orkney, Scotland, UK

Dear Dr Patterson,

I have sent the details of his case, using the form provided.

I do not think that I can get biological samples to you, much as I'd like to - the cost would be horrendous, also - this is a very remote part of Scotland and we have a hard enough job getting a parcel to the south of England in three days, let alone the USA!

If samples get taken and analysed here, I will send any results, though!

Many thanks

Liz Hansen
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Post by Liz Hansen » Wed Nov 21, 2001 11:48 am

Hello Dougie,
We have a collaboration with the researchers at the Animal Health Trust in England. You may use the forms on this website and send a sample to Dr Matthew Binns at the AHT if you would like to participate. That would probably be much easier (both from logistics and monetary considerations!) for you to do.

We have gotten your seizure survey, so that is helpful - thank you for taking the time to fill it out. Good luck with Snorri!

Liz

Dougie
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Post by Dougie » Sat Nov 24, 2001 8:02 pm

Orkney, Scotland, UK

Snorri on 30mg Phenobarb, twice a day, since 30/10/01 and no more siezures yet (26 days and counting!) - would have expected at least one in that period, had the emerging pattern been left unattended.

We are keeping a very keen eye on him, all the same!

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