One dog responsible??

This is the main focus of the research underway by the Canine Epilepsy Research Consortium. Some of your questions may not have clear answers at this time, but ask them anyway!

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GreatDaneNut
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Location: Argos, IN,USA
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One dog responsible??

Post by GreatDaneNut » Tue Mar 19, 2002 4:35 pm

Would it be possible for this disease to just pop up out of no-where or so it seems and get spread through following generations. I had a pup who started having seizures at 9 months, Since this happened I have been in contact with other people who bought puppies from the same litter & other pups are seizing also. This stud dog has been line bred & total outcrossed and all 3 litters are having pups with seizures. As far as anyone knows at this point there had been no seizures in the lines until this particular dog was bred.He himself does not have seizures. Sadly, his owner continues to breed him and offer him for stud. We are very sad & very concerned that this is going to spead like wild fire through out our breed since all the pups go out on full registration.

Ned Patterson DVM
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Post by Ned Patterson DVM » Wed Mar 27, 2002 8:42 am

We do not yet know the answer to your question in any dog breed but should in the next few years. Once we have determined the gene or genes that causes primary (idiopathic) epilepsy in a particular breed we will be able to give you some concrete answers. Most likely the genes and mode of inheritance will be different in different dog breeds, except it may be similar in closely related breeds.

There are some genes for primary epilepsy that have been discovered in people that have autosomal dominant inheritance with partial penetrance. In which one "bad" copy of the gene causes epilepsy most but not all of the time. In this type of situation one individual with the gene could pass it without having seizures.

In most of the breeds we have studied so far the inheritance appears to be autosomal recessive (to be affected one bad copy of the gene from each parent who are usually unaffected carriers) or polygenic (more than one gene). It is possible that dominant inheritance could exist in some breeds or some lines within some breeds.

It would be great if you could get some or most of the affected dogs, unaffected siblings, the dams to participate in our research. Obviously it would be really great to get the stud also if that is possible, but we could possibly make some significant progress without him if we could get most of the other individuals. See the research section and sample submission sections for more details. Thanks for your concern.

[This message has been edited by Ned Patterson DVM (edited 03-27-2002).]

GreatDaneNut
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Joined: Tue Mar 19, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Argos, IN,USA
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Post by GreatDaneNut » Wed Mar 27, 2002 9:18 am

Thanks for your reply, I am happy to tell you that we are indeed collecting blood from these dogs for the study. Trying to get the studs owner to join us, Is like pulling teeth! But I think it just might happen as there is one of us victims who is not giving up on bugging him to get it done.
My dane has been having seizures on the new moon for 6 months. He is on 600 mg of Phenobarbitol a day. I had to place him in a home with a stay at home mom to insure he is getting the around the clock care he needs. I could not keep my sweet boy here and risk him getting hurt while I was at work. This has been very heartbreaking for me. It appears that he is going blind now. He has also been losing weight lately, Don't know if its the medicine?? Thanks again.

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